Sothil or traditional susruk, collection of the Tembi Museum of Rumah Budaya

Sothil itself in the frying process serves to flip the fried side dishes rather evenly cooked and of course so they don’t burn. In addition, this tool also functions at the same time to lift cooked side dishes from the pan.

Sothil is a kitchen utensil used for frying. This tool is usually used as a set with other tools, namely a frying pan and erok-erok for frying. All three have different functions. Sothil itself in the frying process serves to flip the fried side dishes rather evenly cooked and of course so they don’t burn. In addition, this tool also functions at the same time to lift the cooked side dishes from the pan, then put them into the erok-erok so that the oil drains. Sothil is also known as susruk or implant.

Sothil materials vary. Can be made of aluminum, zinc, or iron plate. Some are combined with other materials, such as wood and bamboo. Generally traditional sothil made from simple like that.

The sothil at the end is triangular or rectangular in shape measuring about 5 cm x 7 cm (according to the size of the sothil), then at the base (where the handle) is cylindrical, with a diameter of about 1-2 cm and a length of about 30 cm. Likewise, sothil which is made from a combination of zinc or aluminum with wood or bamboo, usually also consists of flat and cylindrical parts. The flat part is made of zinc or aluminum, while the cylindrical handle can be made of wood or bamboo. Children are now more familiar with it as a spatula, like the one used by the Spongebob character.

Currently, there are also many sothil made of wood, almost similar to a solet. The manufacture is very neat and smooth because it is usually processed with a lathe. Sothil made of this wood usually comes from strong or light woods, such as glugu (coconut trunk), sengon and mahogany. It’s just that the wooden sothil at the end and the base (handle) are all made of wood, similar to enthong.

Sothil with simple ingredients and made traditionally has long been known and used by Javanese people, especially mothers who work in the kitchen. Of course, other people in the archipelago are also familiar with a similar tool even though it has a different name. Javanese people have long known the term sothil, at least this name has been recorded in the “Baoesastra Java” Dictionary by WJS Poerwadarminta in 1939 page 580 published by NV Groningen in Batavia (Jakarta).

In its development, this kind of tool is still used by the Javanese people even though it has undergone a very drastic change in materials. Nowadays, sothils are made of a variety of good quality metals, including stainless steel. In addition, the shape is increasingly diverse and of good quality. Good quality, the price is more than IDR 25,000.

Simple and traditional sothil kitchen utensils are still often found in traditional markets and stalls. Many supermarkets also provide cheap sothil starting from IDR 7,500. Sothil will continue to survive as long as people still fry side dishes as part of the menu.

Source: Tembi

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