Welcome to softilmu, a simple blog that shares knowledge with sincerity, this time we will share knowledge about Hooke’s Law and Elasticity. Some of the main points we will cover are Understanding Hooke’s Law and Elasticitys, Hooke’s Law Concepts and Elasticity, Magnitudes and Formulas in Hooke’s Law and Elasticity,
A. DEFINITION OF HOOKE’S LAW AND ELASTICITY
Hooke’s law and elasticity are two related terms. To understand the meaning of the word elasticity, many people make an analogy of the term with objects made of rubber, although basically not all objects with rubber base material are elastic. We take two examples of rubber bands and rubber gum. If the rubber band is pulled, then its length will continue to increase to a certain extent. Then, when the pull is released, the length of the rubber band will return to its original state. Unlike the case with chewing gum, if it is pulled its length will continue to increase to a certain extent but if the pull is released the length of the gum will not return to its original state. This can happen because rubber bands are elastic while chewing gum is plastic. However, if the rubber band is pulled continuously sometimes the shape of the rubber band does not return to its original shape, which means that its elastic properties have been lost. So it takes a high level of foresight to classify which objects are elastic and plastic.
So, it can be concluded that elasticity is the ability of an object to return to its original shape after the force on the object is removed. The situation in which an object can no longer return to its original shape due to the force exerted on the object is too large is called elastic limit. While Hooke’s law is an idea introduced by Robert Hooke who investigates the relationship between the forces acting on a spring/other elastic object so that the object can return to its full form or not exceed the elastic limit.
Thus, it can be concluded that Hooke’s Law examines the maximum amount of force that can be applied to an elastic object (often a spring) so as not to exceed its elastic limit and eliminate the elastic nature of the object.
B. HOOKE’S LEGAL CONCEPT AND ELASTICITY

Hooke’s Law is “If the tensile force applied to a spring does not exceed the elastic limit of the material, the increase in the length of the spring is directly proportional to the tensile force

If the applied force exceeds the elasticity limit, then the object cannot return to its original shape and if the applied force continues to increase, the object can be damaged. In other words, Hooke’s law only applies to the limit of elasticity.
From this idea, it can be concluded that the concept of Hooke’s law explains the relationship between the force applied to a spring in terms of the increase in length experienced by the spring. The magnitude of the ratio between the force and the length of the spring is constant. This phenomenon can be more easily understood by paying attention to the following graphic image.
Figure 1, explains that if the spring is pulled to the right, the spring will stretch and increase in length. If the tensile force applied to the spring is not too large, then the increase in the length of the spring is proportional to the magnitude of the tensile force. In other words, the greater the tensile force, the greater the increase in the length of the spring.
In Figure 2, it is illustrated that the slope of the graph is equal which shows the ratio of the magnitude of the tensile force to the increase in the length of the spring is constant. This describes the stiffness property of a spring which is known as spring stability. Mathematically Hooke’s law can be written as follows.

Information:

F = External force exerted (N)
k = Spring constant (N/m)
x = Increase in the length of the spring from its normal position (m)
C. MANUFACTURES AND FORMULA IN HOOKE’S LAW AND ELASTICITY
Stress is a condition in which an object experiences an increase in length when an object is given a force at one end while the other end is held. For example, suppose a wire with a cross-sectional area xm2, with an initial length of x meters being pulled with a force of N at one end while being held at the other end, the wire will experience an increase in length of x meters. This phenomenon describes a stress which in physics is symbolized by and mathematically can be written as follows.

Information:

= Voltage (N/ m2 or Pa)
Strain is the ratio of the increase in the length of the wire in x meters to the initial length of the wire in x meters. Strain can occur because the force applied to the object or wire is removed, so that the wire returns to its original shape.
This relationship can be written mathematically as below.

Information:

L = Increase in length (m)
Lo = original length (m)
According to the above equation, strain (e) has no units because the increase in length (ΔL) and the initial length (Lo) are quantities with the same units.
3. Modulus of Elasticity (Young’s Modulus)
In physics, the modulus of elasticity is symbolized by E. The modulus of elasticity describes the ratio between stress and strain experienced by a material. In other words, the elastic modulus is proportional to stress and inversely proportional to strain.

Information:

E = Modulus of elasticity (N/m)
= Voltage (N/ m2 or Pa)

Compression is a state that is almost similar to strain. The difference lies in the direction of displacement of the object’s molecules after being given a force. It is different in the case of strain where the object molecules will be pushed out after being given a force. In compression, after being given a force, the object’s molecules will be pushed inward (compress).

5. Relationship between Tensile Force and Modulus of Elasticity
If written mathematically, the relationship between tensile force and modulus of elasticity includes:

Information:

E = Modulus of elasticity (N/m)
= Voltage (N/ m2 or Pa)
E = Modulus of elasticity (N/m)
L = Increase in length (m)
Lo = original length (m)
Hooke’s law states that “If the dance force does not exceed the elastic limit of the spring, then the increase in the length of the spring is directly proportional to the tensile force. Mathematically written as follows.

Information:

F = External force exerted (N)
k = Spring constant (N/m)
x = Increase in the length of the spring from its normal position (m)
Hooke’s Law for Spring Arrangements
If two springs having the same spring constant are connected in series, then the length of the spring becomes 2x. Therefore, the spring equation is:

Information:

k = Spring constant (N/m)
While the equation for n springs which are constant and arranged in series is written as follows.

Information:

If the springs are arranged in parallel, the length of the spring will remain as before, while the cross-sectional area becomes more than 2x than if the springs were arranged in 2 pieces. The spring equations for two springs arranged in parallel are:

Information:

Kp = Equation of parallel arrangement spring
k = Spring constant (N/m)
While the equation for n springs with the same constant and arranged in parallel, a stronger spring will be produced because the spring constant will be greater. The spring equation can be written as follows.

Information:

In the application of Hooke’s law, it is closely related to objects whose working principle uses springs and which are elastic. Hooke’s law principles have been applied to the following objects.
  • A microscope that serves to see very small micro-organisms that cannot be seen by the naked eye
  • A telescope that functions to see objects that are far away so that they appear close, such as celestial objects
  • Measuring the acceleration of gravity of the earth
  • A clock that uses a peer as a timer
  • The gauze clock or chronometer is used to determine the line or position of the ship at sea
  • Connection of gear sticks for both motorcycles and cars
  • Spring swing
  • Some of the objects mentioned above have an important role in human life. In other words, Hooke’s ideas have a positive impact on the quality of human life.

So that’s our post this time about Hooke’s Law and Elasticitys. Hopefully it can be useful. If there is still something you don’t understand, please ask friends via the comment box, we will try to respond quickly and accurately. Thank you for visiting softscience, don’t forget to follow and comment, okay?

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